Is it challenging to manage your priorities in life? (Part 1 of 3) (#5)

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Is it challenging to manage your priorities in life? (Part 1 of 3)

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Why is it so difficult to manage our priorities? Do you sometimes feel overwhelmed by the urgent professional challenges you need to tackle, while at the same time trying to build and maintain your important personal relationships, your finances and even your own health? Could it be that you have not figured out a way to allocate time to the true priorities in your life, and thus spend your time reacting to whatever event is in front of you?

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In this newsletter, I want to share a set of personal insights that can help you gradually manage more and more of your life priorities. I will start with what has worked for me in managing my physical health. In the next two newsletters, I will cover other elements.

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As outlined in my recently released book, The Business Apostolate: Insights to Define and Achieve Your Mission in Life, there are three steps you can follow to live a more meaningful life:

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Step 1: Become 100 percent accountable for the decisions you make (and not make) in your life.\nStep 2: Develop and record in writing your personal mission statement.\nStep 3: Live your mission 24/7.

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Click here if you want to buy my book with a special discount for newsletter readers. Just enter code UN2WS547.

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Related to Step 3, one strategy that has worked for me to live my personal development mission is to undergo a physical examination every year or two, and use the results as my “Health Report Card.” I realize I am the only person accountable for getting good health grades, especially as the years go by. And I have increasingly relied on the advice of health professionals (doctors, dieticians, sports experts) to not only address any negative health grade but to also improve those that may be within acceptable levels. Let me share the type of interventions that have worked for me and could work for you as well.

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The first one is to watch what I eat. After experimenting with different diets that called for counting calories, skipping carbohydrates, eating less, or combining food categories in specific ways, I ended up following the professional advice I received four years ago: a) Eat healthy; b) eat all three broad groups of food (protein, whole-grain carbohydrates and fruits/vegetables), plus some unsaturated fats; and c) eat reasonable portions. This advice made a lot of sense to me. I loved its simplicity. Over the years, I have noticed a direct relationship between my weight and my lab test results with how closely I follow this advice. Whenever I deviate (unfortunately more often than I wish), my clothes will immediately let me know I need to intervene. If you want to commit to make good eating a priority in your life, start by using your electronic or paper agenda to record a daily reminder of adopting, over the next week, one of the elements I outline here. Based on how successful you are in this first week, you can renew your commitment for the following one or make any necessary adjustments.

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The second health element that has worked for me is exercise. I try to run six days a week. My motivation is three-fold: 1) Running energizes me to tackle the workday, 2) I convince myself that each mile run represents a large dose of “health” that I am injecting into my body, and 3) it synergizes with my food habits to keep my weight under control. It is not easy to create a habit of daily running. You start very slowly, with perhaps a 5-minute walk every other day, and gradually increase the frequency, length and intensity of your exercise. As I outline in my book, if you are a goal-oriented person, try signing up for a race, like a 1-miler or a 5K, run it, and then try to beat your finish time in a future race. Or try another physical activity. If you want to make exercising a priority, try scheduling these activities in your agenda as if they were formal work meetings. It also helps to find a partner to exercise with and keep you accountable.

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The third health element is good sleep. I used to underestimate the power of a good night sleep. However, I have learned that, if I get at least seven hours of continuous sleep, I wake up the next day ready to tackle my running and my subsequent daily responsibilities. I have also learned that good sleep decreases the odds of suffering from illnesses, such as Alzheimer’s. Having had an instance of this terrible disease in my family has made me even more sensitive to getting a regular good night sleep. Though this may sound a bit too structured for some of you, I set a reminder in my cell phone an hour before I want to fall asleep. I know I need this hour to wind down, do some reading, and eventually fall asleep. Maybe this strategy will work for you as well.

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I want to close this newsletter with a quote from the Roman poet Virgil: “The greatest wealth is health.” If your physical health is a priority, test one or more of my suggestions. As you embark on this journey, count on me to help you succeed.

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In the next newsletter, I will share additional insights on how to better manage your priorities in life. Stay tuned!

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Percy M. Cannon\nAuthor, Business Consultant and Professional Coach\nwww.cannonbalance.com\nwww.thebusinessapostolate.com

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PS1: Use this link to ask questions, post comments, and request topics you would like to see in future issues.\nPS2: Use this link to subscribe to future newsletter issues or review previous ones.

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