Improving Work-Life Balance

Improving Work-Life Balance

\n\n148,000,000 . . . this is the number of results returned when I searched online for the term “work-life balance.” Why such a high interest in this topic?\n\nAccording to a recent study by the advisory firm The Corporate Executive Board Company, work-life balance is the second most important attribute in the workplace, behind compensation. Another study by market research firm StrategyOne shows that 89 percent of employees surveyed reported that work-life balance was a problem for them, with 54 percent of them calling it a significant problem.\n\nMy own experience gathered in the three companies, five countries and several global cultures I worked with validates these findings. On a personal level, I still remember how much I struggled in my early professional years to leave work early enough to catch my kids awake.\n\nFrom the several definitions of work-life balance that I have reviewed, the one that best matches my own views is from Businessdictionary.com: “A comfortable state of equilibrium achieved between an employee’s primary priorities of their employment position and their private lifestyle.”\n\nBased on what I learned and experienced during the 30 years I have spent in the corporate world, I have become convinced that this prioritization between work and lifestyle may be difficult to achieve in the absence of a clear definition of what represents success in our life, overall, and for our work and personal roles. Too many people in the corporate world, consciously or unconsciously, have not invested the time to clearly define what is truly important in their lives. As a result, the usually well-defined business responsibilities and goals tend to trump the loosely defined personal priorities.\n\nI invite you to consider following the three steps I share in my book The Business Apostolate: Insights to Define and Achieve Your Mission in Life (El negocio mas grande de su vida in its Spanish version):\n\n1. Take 100 percent responsibility and accountability for the decisions in your life.\n2. Develop and record in writing your personal mission statement.\n3. Live your mission every day, for the rest of your life.\n\nYou can also discover more information about these three steps by reading previous issues of this newsletter and by subscribing to future releases.\n\nI want to close this newsletter with the list of “The Top Five Regrets of the Dying,” prepared by Bronnie Ware, a woman who worked for years with the dying and who wrote a book with the same title:\n1. I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.\n2. I wish I hadn’t worked so hard.\n3. I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings.\n4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.\n5. I wish I had let myself be happier.\n\nDon’t wait until your final days to define and live the successful and purposeful life you are capable of. As you embark on this journey, count on me to help you succeed.\n\nIn the next newsletter, I will share more suggestions on how to learn from the pivotal points in our lives. Stay tuned!\n\nPercy M. Cannon\nAuthor, Business Consultant and Professional Coach\nwww.cannonbalance.com\n\nPS1: Use this link to ask questions, post comments, and request topics you would like to see in future issues.\nPS2: Use this link if you want to buy my book, The Business Apostolate, Insights to Define and Achieve your Mission in Life with a special discount for newsletter readers. Just enter code UN2WS547.

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