Category Archives: Uncategorized

How to Focus and Maximize Your Productivity (the Definitive Guide)

Several good tips in this article on how to maximize your productivity. Their first suggestion is my favorite one: schedule time for yourself. I would add to do so first thing in the morning. Make sure you first cover your most important task. Even if the rest of the day is spent fighting fire drills, you will have at least accomplished the one thing most important to you. Block the first hour in your calendar now for the rest of the year.\r\n\r\nhttps://www.lifehack.org/680976/how-to-focus-and-maximize-your-productivity-the-definitive-guide

Millennials Managers: A Guide For Successful Management

Good suggestions. I would add that a successful people manager, regardless of age generation, should be crystal clear on: I) what is expected from the employee, and ii) what the manager will do to help the employee meet such expectations. Any reactions?\r\n\r\nhttps://www.forbes.com/sites/jamiehopkins/2017/07/08/millennials-managers-a-guide-for-successful-management/#393e7c722ac3

Are Telecommuters More Productive than Office Workers?

A recent study, referred to in this article, seems to validate this statement. Some of the benefits of remote working mentioned in the study were:

  • Better communication
  • Improved work-life balance
  • More flexibility with child care

Other insights reported in the article indicate that:

  • Technology tools that enable communication and collaboration are motivating workers to pick up the phone and seek Facetime.
  • More millennials are demanding flexibility as an office perk.

My opinion, as stated in previous newsletters, is it takes two to tango. Managers should stay tuned-in to the individual flexibility preferences of their employees and discuss the best way to combine in-person and remote work approaches. Employees should voice their flexibility preferences to their bosses and, above all, meet or exceed their respective performance goals. Only then should this and other work “perks” be endorsed by their employers.

Percy M. Cannon www.cannon.consulting

Do You Need Help Setting Your Life Goals?

As announced in my July newsletter, this month we will launch LifePlan, a smartphone and tablet app initially available for iPhones and iPads.\r\n\r\nFollowing the blog entries published in July, I will continue to provide additional details on how LifePlan can improve your life results.\r\n\r\nIn this article, I want to outline portions of an exercise included in LifePlan, which are aimed at setting life goals.\r\n\r\nThe exercise builds on the work done (outlined in this blog entry) on defining your life roles. It’s important to connect your goals to a central part of your personal mission statement (e.g., your life roles). Why? Because goals that are not tied to an important part of your life stand a lower chance of getting your attention.\r\n\r\nConversely, goals that assign specific achievement criteria offer a higher chance of success.\r\n\r\nFor each life role, LifePlan will ask you to set a specific, measurable, and date-sensitive goal, first for the next three to five years, and then for the next six to twelve months.\r\n\r\nMost of us have experienced some type of goal-setting system at work. Why not apply the same concept to the rest of your roles?\r\n\r\nStay tuned for more news about LifePlan next Monday.\r\n\r\nUse this link to be added to the waiting list for LifePlan.\r\n\r\nPercy M. Cannon\r\nAuthor, Speaker, Consultant, Facilitator & Coach\r\nwww.cannon.consulting

Do You Need Help Defining Your Life Roles?

As announced in my July newsletter, this month we will launch LifePlan, a smartphone and tablet app initially available for iPhones and iPads.\r\n\r\nFollowing the blog entries published in July, I will continue to provide additional details on how LifePlan can improve your life results.\r\n\r\nIn this article, I want to outline portions of an exercise included in LifePlan, which are aimed at defining the different roles in your life.\r\n\r\nThe first step in this role definition exercise is to review your personal mission statement and use it as inspiration and guidance to choose your life roles.\r\n\r\nLifePlan then offers you a list of potential roles. You can choose to define them at a basic level (e.g., Professional and Personal) or to be more specific (e.g., Employee, Family, Financial, and Community).\r\n\r\nThe importance of this exercise is that it invites you to be accountable for the role choices you make in your life and to connect them to your personal mission statement. If you do not choose roles that correlate with your personal mission statement, you may leave yourself vulnerable to live roles based on somebody else’s priorities and not your own.\r\n\r\nStay tuned for more news about LifePlan next Monday.\r\n\r\nUse this link to be added to the waiting list for LifePlan.\r\n\r\nPercy M. Cannon\r\nAuthor, Speaker, Consultant, Facilitator & Coach\r\nwww.cannon.consulting

Embracing Accountability

As outlined in this month’s newsletter, I will expand on “The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team” model by Patrick Lencioni in my blog. The first three behaviors were covered in previous blog entries (Trust, Conflict and Commitment). I will now cover the fourth one, “Embracing Accountability.”\r\n\r\nMembers of effective teams hold one another accountable, rather than relying on the leader. Asking the leader to be the primary source of accountability is inefficient and breeds politics. It is far more effective when team members go directly to one another and give frank, honest feedback.\r\n\r\nTeams that do not hold one another accountable:\r\n• Create resentment among team members who have different standards of performance\r\n• Encourage mediocrity\r\n• Miss deadlines and key deliverables\r\n• Place an undue burden on the team leader as the sole source of discipline\r\n\r\nWhen it comes to teamwork, accountability is the willingness of team members to remind one another when they are not living up to agreed-on performance standards. Direct, peer-to-peer accountability is based on the notion that peer pressure and the aversion to letting down colleagues will motivate team players more than any fear of authoritative punishment.\r\n\r\nThe key to making accountability part of a team’s culture is the willingness of the team leader to model the behavior by stepping into the middle of a difficult situation and reminding individual team members of their responsibilities, both in terms of behavior and results. Accountability starts with the leader. Although the leader should not be the primary source of accountability, he or she should be the ultimate source.\r\n\r\nNext Monday I will cover the fifth behavior: Delivering Collective Results. Stay tuned!\r\n\r\nPercy M. Cannon\r\n\r\ncoaching\r\n\r\nwww.cannon.consulting