Category Archives: Newsletters

Do You Want to Become a Better Corporate Manager?

Being a manager in a corporation is not easy. You likely face a litany of challenges and are expected to rise to the occasion with little help. You are expected to deliver your performance objectives with limited resources, work with colleagues you may not necessarily trust, or deal with lackluster direct reports. Do any of these problems sound familiar?

If challenges like these are not addressed promptly, you could miss your performance objectives and hurt your advancement opportunities. So, you have two choices: Do more of what you have been doing or elevate your game as a manager by learning how to deliver results through others.

In this and future articles, I will share tips to help you become a better corporate manager. I will build on the lessons learned during my 25 years as a manager for three large corporations (P&G, IBM, and Microsoft), as well as my seven years as an executive coach for over 200 professionals. 

Tip #1: Become a coach to your direct reports.Think about the best manager you’ve had in your life. What made them such a good manager? In my case, early in my corporate career I had a manager who regularly called me to his office to brainstorm potential solutions to business challenges. One of these challenges was to address the low brand awareness of a recently launched product. We held several

brainstorming sessions, covering such topics as defining the problem, reviewing the data available, searching for best practices, developing potential solutions, finding alternative ways to enlist other internal areas for feedback and support, developing a plan, seeking approval and funding, and executing the plan.

Throughout the entire process, my manager coached me, mostly one-on-one. At the end, he empowered me to lead the execution of the plan: making our product the exclusive sponsor of a game show in a highly rated TV time slot. This and other actions resulted in significant improvements in brand awareness, sales, and market share.      

My manager not only coached me on how to analyze and address business challenges, but he also taught me how to coach direct reports. I paid it forward when I became a corporate manager myself and aimed to follow his coaching best practices with my new direct reports.

Contact me if you need help developing the skills and capabilities to become a better coach, significantly increase your business results through your direct reports (and peers and even your boss) and, as a result, accelerate your career growth.

Percy M. Cannon
www.cannon.consulting

The Go-Giver Way™️

Creating a Culture of Excellence The Go-Giver Way, Part 5

This is the last article of a five-part series where I provide suggestions that you can start adopting right away to promote excellence within and outside your organization. If you missed any of the previous ones, please click here.

I will continue to build on the content from “The Go-Giver book series written by Bob Burg and John David Mann, as well as my nearly four decades of international corporate experience, first as an executive and now as a coach.

Today, we will cover the fifth principle, The Law of Receptivity: The key to effective giving is to stay open to receiving.

Giving and receiving are two sides of the same coin. They work best in tandem. It’s like breathing out and breathing in, like exhaling and inhaling. They work together. Giving is possible because there is somebody else who will receive. If you don’t allow yourself to receive, you stop the flow. Giving earns you the right, not the entitlement, to receive.

Initially, I had some reservations about this law, perhaps tied to negative experiences with “Give-to-Get” practices. Time has proved me wrong.

As part of my executive coaching practice, at the beginning of each engagement, I regularly include an exercise called 360 feedback. It is a process where the coach gathers feedback on the executive from bosses, peers, and direct reports. In one case, the executive was a CEO of a joint venture. He reported to a board with representatives of the two shareholder groups. I had phone calls with most of the board members.

Something interesting—and out of left field—happened in one of these calls. It was with the senior member of one of the shareholders, whom I did not know before the call. After giving me his feedback on the CEO, he asked me questions about my coaching practice and experience. Several months later, and within a few days apart, this group referred me to two executives from different companies. Of course, I gladly accepted the referrals and thanked them for their generosity.

The Law of Receptivity and its complementary Law of Left Field (the greatest gifts will come to you at moments and from places you least expect) were probably the most difficult ones for me to grasp…until the referrals started arriving…out of left field.

When an organization truly exhibits a culture of excellence, we see greater collaboration and productivity, increased innovation, and improved satisfaction for both internal and external customers. Living with a giving spirit creates a rising tide that raises all ships, including the one belonging to the generator of this tide. Create a culture of excellence, and you will reap the rewards of excellence.

Contact me if you wish to adopt a culture of excellence The Go-Giver Way and enjoy extraordinary results.

Percy M. Cannon
www.cannon.consulting

The Go-Giver Way™️

Creating a Culture of Excellence The Go-Giver Way, Part 4

This is the fourth article of a five-part series where I provide suggestions that you can start adopting right away to promote excellence within and outside your organization. If you missed any of the previous ones, please click here.

I will build on the content from “The Go-Giver book series written by Bob Burg and John David Mann, as well as my nearly four decades of international corporate experience, first as an executive and now as a coach.

Today, we will cover the fourth principle, The Law of Authenticity: The most valuable gift you have to offer is yourself.  

Authenticity is something you can’t fake, at least not for the long term. People can smell falsehood a mile away, so show up as yourself. All the skills in the world (sales, technical, people, etc.), as important as they are, are all useless if you don’t come at it from your true, authentic core.

What can you do to discover and live from your authentic core? In a previous article, I outlined the steps I took to redefine mine when I was approaching 50. However, you don’t need to wait until you turn 50 or any age to discover and define your authentic core or, as it was in my case, to redefine it.

The concepts of intrinsic and extrinsic value can help you in this process. We, as individuals, have two types of value:

  1. Intrinsic or internal value: We automatically have this by virtue of being born.
  2. Extrinsic or market value: This is your strengths, traits, talents, and characteristics that allow you to add value to others, your organization, the marketplace, and the world, in a way that you get compensated for it.

One thing I learned early in my corporate career was to deal differently with strengths and weaknesses:

  • Drive your strengths as hard and proactively as possible. This is what will shape your market value.
  • Manage your weaknesses. Unless they are severe, your value proposition will probably not be driven by devoting time and energy into attempting to turn them into strengths.

My advice to you: Focus on your assets of value. Become a professional student by:

  • Reading books and participating in training programs to grow your skills.
  • Learning from others: Search for role models and adapt what is applicable to you.
  • Using coaching and mentoring to accelerate your professional growth.

Remember: “A critical skill in your business is your capacity to be authentic—to make a connection.”

Contact me if you wish to discover or adjust your authentic core, as a step toward adopting a culture of excellence The Go-Giver Way and enjoying extraordinary results.

Percy M. Cannon
www.cannon.consulting

The Go-Giver Way™️

Creating a Culture of Excellence The Go-Giver Way, Part 3

This is the third article of a five-part series where I provide suggestions that you can start adopting right away to promote excellence within and outside your organization. If you missed any of the previous articles, please click here.

I will build on the content from “The Go-Giver book series written by Bob Burg and John David Mann, as well as my nearly four decades of international corporate experience, first as an executive and now as a coach.

Today, we will cover the third principle, The Law of Influence: Your influence is determined by how abundantly you place other people’s interests first.  

If you want to attract people to you and your ideas, there are two broad ways to accomplish this:

  • Use positional leadership, which may drive compliance but is not very effective, or
  • By influence, which drives commitment by focusing on “what’s in it for the other person.”

Three features that enable genuine influencers to accomplish great things with and through people are:

  • They kick off meetings by “framing” the issue or topic to be covered and by clarifying the goals, then they step back to let the discussion flow.
  • They step into the other person’s shoes. They listen to the interests of the meeting participants to understand what’s in it for them.
  • They let go of having to be right and allow team members to share their suggestions without being concerned about contradicting the leader.

Bob Burg, co-author of “The Go-Giver,” follows what he calls “The Golden Rule of Business”: “All things being equal, people will do business with, and refer business to, those people they know, like and trust.” A variation of this rule also holds true for relationships within an organization: “People will assist, do things for, make things easier for, speed up the process for, and collaborate with those whom they know, like, and trust.”

How can you apply the three elements of this Golden Rule of Business to the corporate world?

  1. Know: It’s not just about who you know, but also who knows you and knows how effective you are in leading and influencing others.
  2. Like: By showing genuine interest in a person, you will find that the know, like, and trust relationship builds faster. Ask them questions, such as how they started their professional career, what they enjoy most from their job, and in what ways can you contribute to their work.
  3. Trust: This may take time, and it’s one area where referrals, covered in Part 2, can become very useful.
     

There is no better or more powerful way to influence others than by switching your focus from “What’s in it for me” to the “What’s in it for them.”

Contact me if you see an opportunity to adjust your personal or team’s influence style as a step toward adopting a culture of excellence The Go-Giver Way and enjoying extraordinary results.

Percy M. Cannon
www.cannon.consulting

The Go-Giver Way™️

Creating a Culture of Excellence The Go-Giver Way, Part 2

This is the second article of a five-part series where I provide suggestions that you can start adopting right away to promote excellence within and outside your organization. If you missed Part 1, please click here.

I will build on the content from “The Go-Giver book series written by Bob Burg and John David Mann, as well as my nearly four decades of international corporate experience, first as an executive and now as a coach.

Today, we will cover the second principle, The Law of Compensation: Your income is determined by how many people you serve and how well you serve them.  

The Law of Value, covered in Part 1, describes your potential income—how much you could earn. But it’s the Law of Compensation that determines your impact (i.e., how much you actually earn).

A powerful way to increase your impact is through word of mouth. When people endorse you or your business, it is highly effective. Better yet, aim to take this positive word of mouth one step further in the form of referrals. Strive to add such high levels of value to others that they feel compelled to speak well about you.

Referrals are not restricted to expanding your customer base. Two decades ago, while still a corporate executive, I received the dreadful notice that my job was disappearing and I needed to look for work elsewhere. Has this also happened to you? If so, you can probably relate to how painful this experience can be. An ex-boss of mine offered to help. She referred me to an executive in another company, who, in turn, referred me to an executive whom he knew had a job opening that could fit my profile. After a long interview process, I had a new job. It took me eight long months to find it, and it came from a referral of a referral…

Be proactive in asking for referrals as a key strategy to grow your impact. Just be aware that a key prerequisite for this is to exceed the expectations of both your internal and external customers. And there is no faster or more effective way to elicit those feelings than by placing their interests first, which we will cover in our next article.

Contact me if you wish to learn more and explore how you, your team, or your organization can adopt a culture of excellence The Go-Giver Way and enjoy extraordinary results.

Percy M. Cannon

www.cannon.consulting

The Go-Giver Way™️

Creating a Culture of Excellence The Go-Giver Way

Would you like to be recognized as a person who creates a culture of excellence within and outside your organization? In Part 1 of my five-part series, I will provide suggestions that you can start adopting right away to promote excellence at work.

I will build on the content from “The Go-Giver book series written by Bob Burg and John David Mann, as well as my nearly four decades of international corporate experience, first as an executive and now as a coach.

In two previous issues (March 2019 and May 2019), I introduced The Go-Giver philosophy (always aim to add value to others) and The Five Laws of Stratospheric Success displayed by people with a Go-Giver mindset.

Today we will start with The Law of Value: Your true worth is determined by how much more you give in value than you take in payment.  

Your “value” is the relative worth you add to the organization, both in the mind of your boss and in the experience of the people with whom you interact (both internally and externally), which includes your customers.

Your “payment” is the salary and benefits you receive.

What The Law of Value suggests is that you strive to exceed expectations, both inside the organization (with your boss and internal stakeholders), as well as with your external customers. You aim to become the “go-to” person when there is an internal need for someone “special.” You could be the person who works well with people from other teams, who consistently delivers despite potential drawbacks, who can expertly navigate the internal bureaucracy, or whatever other unique or outstanding capability or competence you may have.

By giving exceptional value to others, you will be contributing to building a culture of excellence in your company, no matter where you stand in the organization chart. You will also earn a name for yourself. In fact, in times of cost savings and head-count reductions, you could be the talent others seek, rather than being on the list of people who could be leaving the organization.
Contact me if you wish to learn more and explore how you, your team, or your organization can adopt The Go-Giver mindset and enjoy extraordinary results.

Percy M. Cannon
www.cannon.consulting

The Go-Giver Way™️

How to Give Exceptional Value to Others

How often have you run into people who seem to have the mindset of “I” or “me” first? Their attitude is mostly “take, take, and take” and “what’s in it for me?” Do you enjoy doing business with these “Go-Takers”?

Wouldn’t you rather work with people who have shifted their focus from taking to giving, who are constantly and consistently providing value to others, and who are also driven by the mindset of “what’s in it for them?” but,, in their case, “them” is whomever they are interacting with. We call these people “Go-Givers.”

Is it naive to think and act as a Go-Giver? Not at all. Following are three areas in which the Go-Giver mindset can help you improve at work and in your personal life:

  1. Leadership: What do you have to offer as a leader? Is your aim to have people work for you and achieve your business and career goals? Or is it to work with them, add value to their professional growth and help them achieve their goals?
  2. Sales: Which comes first—creating value for others or making the sale? You can control the former but not so much the latter. Aspire to only intensify your efforts to create value for others. Seek to serve and look for ways to create value and trust, and the time to harvest will come—sometimes at moments and from places you least expect.
  3. Influence: Do you influence by talking (and even mandating) what you consider important, or by listening to what’s significant to other people before making a decision? Is there an opportunity to let go of having to be right?

These are just some of the practical applications you can learn from the “Go-Giver” book series written by Bob Burg and John David Mann.

Giving exceptional value to others will help you enjoy extraordinary results in your professional and personal roles.

Just recently I was honored to become a Certified Go-Giver Coach and Speaker. Contact me if you wish to learn more and explore how you, your team, or your organization can adopt the Go-Giver mindset and enjoy extraordinary results.

Percy M. Cannon
www.cannon.consulting

How Can You Make the Rest of Your Life… the Best of Your Life?

Since the beginning of the year, three different clients have asked me how to plan a second career.

Part of my advice included a summary of the process I followed a decade ago. It was useful to them and could be useful to you, too, if you are considering a career change.

As I was approaching the half-century mark in my life, with one-half of it lived inside the corporate world, I asked myself the following question: How can I make the rest of my life… the best of my life?

Up until this point, I had worked as a corporate executive. I wasn’t sure if I should continue in that vein or try something different.

To decide which path to take, I did some deep soul searching in three areas:

  1. What were my strengths?
  2. What was I passionate about?
  3. How could I better serve people?

The outcome of this process, which took a couple of years, helped me make the necessary adjustments to my Personal Mission Statement and its related professional and personal implications.

I decided to start a second career, focused on helping businesspeople, like you, succeed in both your professional and personal roles.

However, there was an element that was missing: a sense of urgency. I was too comfortable inside the corporate world to make a change . . . that is, until two of my kids announced, within a few days apart, that they were each expecting their first child.

I asked myself what kind of a grandfather I wanted to be. The short answer was to be a present and engaged one. This was the missing element to trigger the execution of my updated Personal Mission Statement.

As a result of this process, nine years ago I quit my corporate job to do, among other things, what I am doing for you today: help you succeed in both your professional and personal roles.

You don’t need to wait until you turn 50 or any age to adjust your Personal Mission Statement. You are never too young or too old to define or redefine what you want to do with your life.

Count on me to help you in this process.

Percy M. Cannon
Corporate Coach
www.cannon.consulting

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Do You Want to Become a Go-Giver?

I recently attended a two-day workshop, called “The Go-Giver Entrepreneurs Academy,” led by the co-author of the “Go-Giver” series, Bob Burg, and his business partner, Kathy Tagenel.

In case you aren’t familiar with this concept, the key message is to “give exceptional value and enjoy extraordinary results.”

Although several of the workshop insights resonated with the good practices I’ve observed in my personal experience and with corporate clients, I want to share with you my top three takeaways:

  1. We have a choice to make: Be a Go-Taker or a Go-Giver. Go-Takers focus on “What’s it for themselves,” whereas Go-Givers are all about “What’s in it for the other person.”
  2. Go-Givers display the Five Laws of Stratospheric Success:
    1. The Law of Value: Your true worth is determined by how much more you give in value than you take in payment.
    2. The Law of Compensation: Your income is determined by how many people you serve and how well you serve them.
    3. The Law of Influence: Your influence is determined by how abundantly you place other people’s interests first.
    4. The Law of Authenticity: The most valuable gift you have to offer is yourself.
    5. The Law of Receptivity: The key to effective giving is to stay open to receiving.
  3. We can apply these concepts and laws to build long-lasting relationships. And we can do so both within our professional and personal roles.

I have given copies of this book as a present to relatives, friends, and clients. After reading it, one of the clients told me he, too, had bought several copies of the book to give as presents.

Are you ready to become a Go-Giver?

Percy M. Cannon
Corporate Coach
www.cannon.consulting

Do You Want to Become an Ultimate Influencer?

If you want to attract people to you and your ideas, there are two broad ways to accomplish this: by force and by persuasion.

In this newsletter I will focus on improving your skills in the latter area, as I assume you’ve seen enough evidence of the long-term challenges using the former.

There are five principles of Ultimate Influence™ outlined in the book Adversaries into Allies by Bob Burg, the author of the sales classic, Endless Referrals and coauthor of the Go-Giver series. These five principles resonated with the challenges I’ve observed in my personal experience and with corporate clients as well:

  1. Control your emotions. Aim to make “calm” your default setting, even when others aren’t. I know this is easier said than done but make a commitment to yourself that your new default setting will be calm. Visualize yourself staying calm and try it in your next meeting. Even if you fail, keep trying. Celebrate your victories.
  2. Understand the clash of belief systems. Don’t assume that the person you are trying to influence thinks in a way that is similar to yours. When in doubt, ask for clarification. And as outlined by Stephen Covey three decades ago, seek first to understand, then to be understood.
  3. Acknowledge their ego. Avoid unnecessary criticism and embarrassment. Highlight the positives in others. Look first for areas where you agree with the other person so they don’t get defensive. Then, and only then, try to persuade.
  4. Set the proper frame. This is where I found the biggest growth opportunity and perhaps you will too. Take the initiative and ensure the most productive frame for your interactions is set (or reset). For example, if the other person is framing the discussion as a choice between two alternatives, neither of which you find attractive, you can reframe it by adding a third option to choose from.
  5. Communicate with tact and empathy. Listen more, talk less. To inspire trust and likeability, find similarities with the person(s) you are trying to influence.

Follow these five principles to become an Ultimate Influencer and avoid resorting to force to attract people to you and your ideas. Persuade by focusing on what’s in it for the person you are trying to influence, instead of “what’s in it for me.”

Percy M. Cannon
Corporate Coach
www.cannon.consulting

PS: Use this link to subscribe to future newsletter issues.