Category Archives: Book

What Do You Really Have To Offer?

I just finished reading The Go-Giver Leader by Bob Burg and John David Mann, one of the four books in The Go-Giver series.

The title of this post is a direct quote from the book. I think it represents an important message and challenge to all of us as leaders: What do we really have to offer to those we are trying to lead? It forces us to think about “What’s in it for them”, “them” being those we are leading, rather than “What’s in it for me.”

Percy M. Cannon
Corporate Coach
www.cannon.consulting

Do You Want to Become an Ultimate Influencer?

If you want to attract people to you and your ideas, there are two broad ways to accomplish this: by force and by persuasion.

In this newsletter I will focus on improving your skills in the latter area, as I assume you’ve seen enough evidence of the long-term challenges using the former.

There are five principles of Ultimate Influence™ outlined in the book Adversaries into Allies by Bob Burg, the author of the sales classic, Endless Referrals and coauthor of the Go-Giver series. These five principles resonated with the challenges I’ve observed in my personal experience and with corporate clients as well:

  1. Control your emotions. Aim to make “calm” your default setting, even when others aren’t. I know this is easier said than done but make a commitment to yourself that your new default setting will be calm. Visualize yourself staying calm and try it in your next meeting. Even if you fail, keep trying. Celebrate your victories.
  2. Understand the clash of belief systems. Don’t assume that the person you are trying to influence thinks in a way that is similar to yours. When in doubt, ask for clarification. And as outlined by Stephen Covey three decades ago, seek first to understand, then to be understood.
  3. Acknowledge their ego. Avoid unnecessary criticism and embarrassment. Highlight the positives in others. Look first for areas where you agree with the other person so they don’t get defensive. Then, and only then, try to persuade.
  4. Set the proper frame. This is where I found the biggest growth opportunity and perhaps you will too. Take the initiative and ensure the most productive frame for your interactions is set (or reset). For example, if the other person is framing the discussion as a choice between two alternatives, neither of which you find attractive, you can reframe it by adding a third option to choose from.
  5. Communicate with tact and empathy. Listen more, talk less. To inspire trust and likeability, find similarities with the person(s) you are trying to influence.

Follow these five principles to become an Ultimate Influencer and avoid resorting to force to attract people to you and your ideas. Persuade by focusing on what’s in it for the person you are trying to influence, instead of “what’s in it for me.”

Percy M. Cannon
Corporate Coach
www.cannon.consulting

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#WorkTrends Recap: Leaders Are Readers

I remember 2 decades ago watching a (physical) banner at my kids grade school which said “Readers are Leaders.” Though inversely entitled (“Leaders are Readers”), the message in this article is the same: reading is a choice. If we “don’t have enough time to read”, could it be because we have assigned a higher priority to other things, such as social media, phone messages or TV? Start small, as suggested in this article, and make it a habit. Look hard for what other activities you may need to stop.

#WorkTrends Recap: Leaders Are Readers

How to Take Baby Steps to Start Living Your Mission In Life

Are you finding it hard to stick to those improvements and goals you have committed to work on?

In a previous newsletter, I outlined a process to define the priorities you plan to cover during the following week and how to pick the top two to three activities you will perform on a particular day. In this newsletter, I will provide three tips on how to take baby steps to maximize the odds of executing the priorities and activities you have defined as important for you.

Tip #1: Allocate the first 15 minutes of the day to an activity that is relevant to you.
If you committed to exercise every day, do it in these first 15 minutes. If you want to eat a healthier diet, jump-start it in those first 15 minutes. If you want to meditate or feed your soul, do it as soon as you wake up. In other words, take care of what’s important to you, literally, first thing in the morning. Otherwise, you run the risk of getting distracted by household chores, email, the newspaper, or other external stimuli.

Tip #2: Allocate the first hour of your workday to the most important (not urgent) business priority.
Those of you in the business world are familiar with facing urgent emails, meetings, or requests the minute you start your workday. Usually, these urgent demands last the entire workday, and sometimes they even follow you afterward via text messages, phone calls, emails, etc. It has been my experience that blocking the first workday hour for an important priority increases the odds of executing that activity, like a deep analysis of your business, coaching an employee, developing a relationship plan for a set of customers, etc. The rest of the workday can then be “syphoned” into putting out fires, but at least one hour will have been allocated to predefined (and usually longer-lasting) important work priorities.

Tip #3: Allocate the first hour of the weekend to an activity that is relevant to you.
The weekend gives us the possibility to allocate time to personal activities. However, it is easy to fall into a routine of social or entertaining activities that may or may not contribute toward achieving your personal goals. My suggestion is to at least pay attention to that first hour of the weekend, and make sure it is allocated to an activity consistent with your mission statement, to what you had chosen as a priority in your life. Some examples of what to do in that first hour are exercising, reading, building (or fixing) relationships, etc.

In summary, my advice is to consciously allocate the first time period in the day, workday, or weekend to activities consistent with your personal mission statement. It’s a good place to start toward living your life more consistently with what you have defined as important to you.

I want to close this newsletter with the Chinese proverb, “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.” As you embark on this journey, count on me to help you succeed.

In the next newsletter, I will share some insights on how to assess your 2013 life performance and prepare for a much better 2014. Stay tuned!

Percy M. Cannon
Author, Business Consultant and Professional Coach
www.cannonbalance.com
www.thebusinessapostolate.com

PS1: Use this link to ask questions, post comments, and request topics you would like to see in future issues
PS2: Use this link to subscribe to future newsletter issues or review previous ones.
PS3: Use this link if you want to buy my book, The Business Apostolate, Insights to Define and Achieve your Mission in Life with a special discount for newsletter readers. Just enter code UN2WS547.

How to Define Your Mission in Life (Part 1 of 3) (#9)

How to Define Your Mission in Life (Part 1 of 3)

Is achieving professional success taking too high a toll on your personal life? Is there something in your personal life that is not allowing you to do your best at work? Do you feel like you’re living your life based on someone else’s priorities? If you answered yes to any of these questions, the solution lies in defining your mission in life.

Defining your mission in life starts with defining your values. Do you know what your values are? The definition of values from Dictionary.com is “relative worth, merit, or importance.” If somebody close to you was asked, based on the way you behave in life, what your values are, what would that person say? What are your behaviors communicating to those around you? Get ready for a potential “Aha” moment. For example, it is not unusual to claim that family represents our No. 1 value in life, but our behaviors may say otherwise, if you are placing work or other relationships before family. I suggest you ask a close friend or family member what she/he believes your top 5 to 10 values in life are.

The second step in defining your mission in life is deciding what are the top 5 to 10 values you want to live your life by? Think in future terms. Think about the kind of values that you want a person close to you to mention after you have died. How will you be remembered? What values would you like to be included in your epitaph? One way to create this list is by looking at those people who have touched your life in a meaningful way and pinpointing which values they stood by. These people could be your spouse, parents, relatives, teachers, co-workers, or any public or historical person. If you would rather pick from a larger list, you can leverage the several online resources on this topic. One which I found particularly useful is www.stevepavlina.com/articles/list-of-values.htm. It provides a long list of value terms from which you can prioritize and eventually come up with your short list.

The third step is to analyze and compare the two previous lists: Any major surprises? Any adjustments you want to make to your list of “desired values”? You should feel fairly comfortable with the resulting list, as it represents the set of “non-negotiable” behaviors you will commit to live your life by. It represents the essence of your mission statement.

This leads us to the final step I want to cover in this newsletter: Write a first draft of your mission statement that is based on the refined list of values from the previous paragraph. Don’t feel compelled to look for examples from other people. Just write down what feels like a good description of the kind of person you want to be thought of by the end your life. Review this first draft as often as needed until you feel comfortable with it.

I want to close this newsletter with a quote from the American writer Mark Twain: “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born. . . and the day you find out why.” As you embark on this journey, count on me to help you succeed.

In the next newsletter, I will share further tips and insights on how to expand your mission statement to include your key roles and goals in life. Stay tuned!

Percy M. Cannon
Author, Business Consultant and Professional Coach
www.cannonbalance.com
www.thebusinessapostolate.com

PS1: Use this link to ask questions, post comments, and request topics you would like to see in future issues.
PS2: Use this link to subscribe to future newsletter issues or review previous ones.
PS3: Use this link if you want to buy my book, The Business Apostolate, Insights to Define and Achieve your Mission in Life with a special discount for newsletter readers. Just enter code UN2WS547.

How Satisfied Are You With Your Career? (#8)

How Satisfied Are You With Your Career?

Are you happy at work, or do you feel overwhelmed? Do you sense there is something in your career that is not allowing you to live the type of life you aspire to? Are you considering switching careers? If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, let me share insights that can prepare you to make important decisions in your professional life.

Over two years ago, I quit my job as a corporate executive to start a second career as a coach, consultant and author. The decision was not an easy one. As my then-manager reflected with me, the decision probably ranked among one of the most important in my life. In this newsletter, I will share the top three elements that led me to this decision. They could help you make a similar choice when such a time comes in your life.

1.    I was happy at work, but I felt there was something else I needed to do with my professional life while I was still in good physical and mental health. For a while I dismissed this “itch,” but every time I updated my personal mission statement, the feeling of wanting to do something different kept growing. I needed to find a better way to connect my professional role to my overall life goal of helping people be happy.

2.    After reading several books on the topic of starting second careers, I realized I needed to answer some fundamental questions:
a.    Which elements from my current professional career better mapped to my overall mission in life? (My answer: solving business challenges and managing people)
b.    What was I good at? (My answer: solving business challenges and connecting with people)
c.    What did I enjoy doing the most? (My answer: solving business challenges and helping people define their future)

The answers to these and other related questions led me to conclude that my second career should not be different but more of an evolution from the first one, centered on businesses and people. Specifically, this new career would encompass the different ways I could help businesses and individuals be successful in what they do or want to do.

3.    The most difficult part was setting a date for the switch and carrying it through. I was happy with the status quo, but I knew I had to pursue this second career. I had prepared myself on:
a.    The business side, by drafting a plan and setting up Percy Cannon International LLC as my business entity;
b.    The financial side, by setting some money aside to cover my living expenses while the new career produced an income; and
c.    The emotional side, by seeking support and advice from my family and close friends.

I was continuously tempted to procrastinate, as it was easy to justify the need for more time to be “fully prepared.” Nevertheless, the triggering event turned out to be the birth of my first two grandchildren and my desire to play a proactive role in supporting their respective parents. The time and flexibility associated with this decision became the turning point to, once and for all, start my new career as an independent professional.

It was the right decision. My second career has allowed me to better fulfill my life mission of helping others be happy, especially in my family (with my wife, kids and grandkids) and through my new work roles (as a business consultant, professional coach and book author). When the time comes, maybe some of the elements I outlined here can help you adjust your life as well.

I want to close this newsletter with a quote from the French writer Henri Bergson, who won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1927: ”To exist is to change, to change is to mature, to mature is to go on creating oneself endlessly.“ Challenge the status quo if you spot an opportunity to improve your life. As you embark on this journey, count on me to help you succeed.

In the next newsletter, I will share insights on how you can start drafting your personal mission statement. Stay tuned!

Percy M. Cannon
Author, Business Consultant and Professional Coach
www.cannonbalance.com
www.thebusinessapostolate.com

PS1: Use this link to ask questions, post comments, and request topics you would like to see in future issues.
PS2: Use this link to subscribe to future newsletter issues or review previous ones.
PS3: Use this link if you want to buy my book, The Business Apostolate, Insights to Define and Achieve your Mission in Life with a special discount for newsletter readers. Just enter code UN2WS547.

Is It Challenging to Manage Your Priorities in Life? (Part 3 of 3) – (#7)

Is It Challenging to Manage Your Priorities in Life? (Part 3 of 3)

Why is it so difficult to manage our priorities? Do you sometimes feel overwhelmed by professional challenges, while also trying to build and maintain your important personal relationships, your finances and even your health? Could it be that you have not figured out a way to allocate time to the true priorities in your life, and thus you spend your time reacting to whatever event is in front of you?

In my previous two newsletters, I shared a set of personal insights that worked for me in managing my physical and mental health. In the last part of this series, I will cover how to manage your spiritual priorities.

As outlined in my recently released book, The Business Apostolate: Insights to Define and Achieve Your Mission in Life, there are three steps you can follow to live a more meaningful life:

Step1: Become 100 percent accountable for the decisions you make (and not make) in your life.
Step 2: Develop and record in writing your personal mission statement.
Step 3: Live your mission 24/7.

Click here if you want to buy my book with a special discount for newsletter readers. Just enter code UN2WS547.

Related to Step 3, one strategy that has worked for me to live my personal development mission is to make it a priority to feed and nurture my spiritual health. Following are three interventions that have worked for me and could work for you as well.

1. Start the day with a few minutes of meditation. This can be in the form of reading the Bible, or another source of spiritual nurturing, and meditating on it. I read the Gospel passage that corresponds to each day and then meditate on the key message that impacts me. My house is still quiet at that time of the day, and by the time I am done, I feel very peaceful and inspired to make the best of the day that is about to start. And, yes, the temptation to check my emails as soon as I wake up is big, but I try to delay this.

2. Leverage opportunities created around trips and social interactions to enrich your soul. I just returned from a wedding in Israel, which I leveraged to visit the Holy Land and other sacred places in Israel and Turkey. I was exposed to the history and traditions of different religions, and I learned that there are many spiritual values shared by them, which, unfortunately, tend to be clouded by political differences. One shared practice is to assign one day of the week for worshipping (Friday for Muslims, Saturday for Jews and Sunday for Christians). I was particularly impressed by the Jewish observance of the Sabbath, where they disconnect from the material world that day, freeing their time for spiritual growth. I will apply this principle to the way I live my Sundays.

3. Track your progress. What about applying some of the principles used in tracking business results to monitoring your spiritual progress? Is there a value you want to strengthen? Though hard to quantify progress, simply raising your awareness of a particular area can create positive results. I once lost my job, and ever since then, I have committed to help anyone who asks for my help to find employment. Every weekend I try to reply to all pending requests and track how many people I have helped.

I want to close this newsletter with a quote from the Dalai Lama: “If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.” Try one or more of my suggestions if you wish to improve managing your spiritual priorities. As you embark on this journey, count on me to help you succeed.

In the next newsletter, I will share some of the insights behind my decision to start a second career as an author, consultant and coach. Stay tuned!

Percy M. Cannon
Author, Business Consultant and Professional Coach
www.cannonbalance.com
www.thebusinessapostolate.com

PS1: Use this link to ask questions, post comments, and request topics you would like to see in future issues.
PS2: Use this link to subscribe to future newsletter issues or review previous ones.

Is It Challenging to Manage Your Priorities in Life? (Part 2 of 3) (#6)

Is It Challenging to Manage Your Priorities in Life? (Part 2 of 3)

Why is it so difficult to manage our priorities? Do you sometimes feel overwhelmed by professional challenges, while also trying to build and maintain your important personal relationships, your finances and even your health? Could it be that you have not figured out a way to allocate time to the true priorities in your life, and thus spend your time reacting to whatever event is in front of you?

In my previous newsletter, I shared a set of personal insights that worked for me in managing my physical health. In Part 2, I will cover how to manage your mental priorities. Next month, I will conclude the series with the management of spiritual priorities.

As outlined in my recently released book, The Business Apostolate: Insights to Define and Achieve Your Mission in Life, there are three steps you can follow to live a more meaningful life:

Step1: Become 100 percent accountable for the decisions you make (and not make) in your life.

Step 2: Develop and record in writing your personal mission statement.

Step 3: Live your mission 24/7.

Click here if you want to buy my book with a special discount for newsletter readers. Just enter code UN2WS547.

Related to Step 3, one strategy that has worked for me to live my personal development mission is to continuously feed and nurture my mind. It always seemed logical to me to accept the notion that feeding my body with good food made a lot of sense. But it took some time to extrapolate the same logic to feeding and nurturing my mind. Following are four interventions that have worked for me and could work for you as well.

1. I became accountable for what I think. I made this commitment to myself several years ago, most likely triggered by books such as Think and Grow Rich, from Napoleon Hill, and reaffirmed by several other books and articles.

2. I planned what kind of “food” I wanted to feed my mind. The “menu” I created was based on my overall life priorities, like how to become a better husband and parent, increase my leadership and managerial skills, improve my financial results, etc. The challenge I faced, and to some extent still do, was that I couldn’t eat all the mental food in front of me! I had to find time to absorb all the knowledge.

3.  I assigned priority to my learning needs and found all the possible time-blocks that could be dedicated to this goal, without punishing my other roles in life. I started by scheduling an hour each evening to read. Since this was not enough, I complemented it by leveraging other events and activities in my life, such as asking about the life story of people I run into (especially the elderly), listening to audio-books while I drive (my current selection is “Conversations With Myself,” by Nelson Mandela) , watching movies that carry relevant messages, etc.

4.  I learned to act as my mind’s information gatekeeper. Technology allows us to be connected 24/7, pretty much anywhere we are. We can read and engage with communities on just about any topic we can imagine. This exposes us to messages that may not add much value. So I let my spam folder filter out the glut of unimportant emails. I have become more and more selective of the acquaintances I make and the conversations I hold, even in informal settings. And, as for TV, I hardly watch any.

I want to close this newsletter with a quote from the British writer James Allen: “Our life is what our thoughts make it. A man will find that as he alters his thoughts toward things and other people, things and other people will alter towards him.” If you want to improve managing your mental priorities, try one or more of my suggestions. As you embark on this journey, count on me to help you succeed.

In the next newsletter, I will share additional insights on how to better manage your spiritual priorities in life. Stay tuned!

Percy M. Cannon
Author, Business Consultant and Professional Coach
www.cannonbalance.com
www.thebusinessapostolate.com

PS1: Use this link to ask questions, post comments, and request topics you would like to see in future issues.
PS2: Use this link to subscribe to future newsletter issues or review previous ones.

Is it challenging to manage your priorities in life? (Part 1 of 3) (#5)

Is it challenging to manage your priorities in life? (Part 1 of 3)

Why is it so difficult to manage our priorities? Do you sometimes feel overwhelmed by the urgent professional challenges you need to tackle, while at the same time trying to build and maintain your important personal relationships, your finances and even your own health? Could it be that you have not figured out a way to allocate time to the true priorities in your life, and thus spend your time reacting to whatever event is in front of you?

In this newsletter, I want to share a set of personal insights that can help you gradually manage more and more of your life priorities. I will start with what has worked for me in managing my physical health. In the next two newsletters, I will cover other elements.

As outlined in my recently released book, The Business Apostolate: Insights to Define and Achieve Your Mission in Life, there are three steps you can follow to live a more meaningful life:

Step 1: Become 100 percent accountable for the decisions you make (and not make) in your life.
Step 2: Develop and record in writing your personal mission statement.
Step 3: Live your mission 24/7.

Click here if you want to buy my book with a special discount for newsletter readers. Just enter code UN2WS547.

Related to Step 3, one strategy that has worked for me to live my personal development mission is to undergo a physical examination every year or two, and use the results as my “Health Report Card.” I realize I am the only person accountable for getting good health grades, especially as the years go by. And I have increasingly relied on the advice of health professionals (doctors, dieticians, sports experts) to not only address any negative health grade but to also improve those that may be within acceptable levels. Let me share the type of interventions that have worked for me and could work for you as well.

The first one is to watch what I eat. After experimenting with different diets that called for counting calories, skipping carbohydrates, eating less, or combining food categories in specific ways, I ended up following the professional advice I received four years ago: a) Eat healthy; b) eat all three broad groups of food (protein, whole-grain carbohydrates and fruits/vegetables), plus some unsaturated fats; and c) eat reasonable portions. This advice made a lot of sense to me. I loved its simplicity. Over the years, I have noticed a direct relationship between my weight and my lab test results with how closely I follow this advice. Whenever I deviate (unfortunately more often than I wish), my clothes will immediately let me know I need to intervene. If you want to commit to make good eating a priority in your life, start by using your electronic or paper agenda to record a daily reminder of adopting, over the next week, one of the elements I outline here. Based on how successful you are in this first week, you can renew your commitment for the following one or make any necessary adjustments.

The second health element that has worked for me is exercise. I try to run six days a week. My motivation is three-fold: 1) Running energizes me to tackle the workday, 2) I convince myself that each mile run represents a large dose of “health” that I am injecting into my body, and 3) it synergizes with my food habits to keep my weight under control. It is not easy to create a habit of daily running. You start very slowly, with perhaps a 5-minute walk every other day, and gradually increase the frequency, length and intensity of your exercise. As I outline in my book, if you are a goal-oriented person, try signing up for a race, like a 1-miler or a 5K, run it, and then try to beat your finish time in a future race. Or try another physical activity. If you want to make exercising a priority, try scheduling these activities in your agenda as if they were formal work meetings. It also helps to find a partner to exercise with and keep you accountable.

The third health element is good sleep. I used to underestimate the power of a good night sleep. However, I have learned that, if I get at least seven hours of continuous sleep, I wake up the next day ready to tackle my running and my subsequent daily responsibilities. I have also learned that good sleep decreases the odds of suffering from illnesses, such as Alzheimer’s. Having had an instance of this terrible disease in my family has made me even more sensitive to getting a regular good night sleep. Though this may sound a bit too structured for some of you, I set a reminder in my cell phone an hour before I want to fall asleep. I know I need this hour to wind down, do some reading, and eventually fall asleep. Maybe this strategy will work for you as well.

I want to close this newsletter with a quote from the Roman poet Virgil: “The greatest wealth is health.” If your physical health is a priority, test one or more of my suggestions. As you embark on this journey, count on me to help you succeed.

In the next newsletter, I will share additional insights on how to better manage your priorities in life. Stay tuned!

Percy M. Cannon
Author, Business Consultant and Professional Coach
www.cannonbalance.com
www.thebusinessapostolate.com

PS1: Use this link to ask questions, post comments, and request topics you would like to see in future issues.
PS2: Use this link to subscribe to future newsletter issues or review previous ones.

Is there is something in your personal life that may be keeping you from doing your best at work? (#4)

Is there is something in your personal life that may be keeping you from doing your best at work?

During my 25 years as a manager in the corporate world, I often wondered, and frequently confirmed, that there were factors in my employees’ personal lives (and in mine) that were preventing us from performing our best at work. Has this happened to you?

In this newsletter, I want to invite you to look into your personal life and determine if there are any potential areas of opportunity which, when improved, can translate into enhancing your motivation, productivity and overall performance at work.

As outlined in my recently released book, The Business Apostolate: Insights to Define and Achieve Your Mission in Life, there are three steps you can follow to live a more meaningful life:

Step1: Become 100 percent accountable for the decisions you make (and not make) in your life.
Step 2: Develop and record in writing your personal mission statement.
Step 3: Live your mission 24/7.

Click here if you want to buy my book with a special discount for newsletter readers. Just enter code UN2WS547.

Related to Step 1, one way to increase your overall accountability is to look deeper into the choices you are currently making in your personal life. In my last newsletter, I offered some insights on how to strengthen your relationships. Let me now expand to other aspects of your personal life.

Are your finances in order? Beyond the natural desire to increase your income, do you have your basic finances under control? Are you spending less than what you are making? Any bad habits you can detect, such as using credit cards to “fund” additional purchasing power, which you cannot sustain? Thinking longer term, have you set a financial goal that will result in a better future? My experience has been that, in good times and in not-so-good ones, setting a financial goal, committing to one or two deliberate actions, and diligently tracking my activities and results, has resulted in positive outcomes. At the most basic level, you increase the awareness of your financial situation and this tends to trigger new ideas to reach your goal. Better yet, your stress level remains within a reasonable range and its potentially negative effect on work gets diminished.

Are you developing your personal capabilities? Are you making healthy choices for your body, mind and soul? Why not start by taking an inventory of those choices you are making (and not making) that can enhance your physical health, expand your mental capacity and feed your soul? You may detect that a sedentary lifestyle and erratic diet are translating into inconsistent energy levels at work. You may also realize that those professionals who keep up with industry and overall trends find it easier to connect with co-workers, customers and people in general. And can you identify an opportunity to nourish your soul with value-enhancing literature or positive thoughts and relationships? One habit I picked up from my father several years ago was starting the day with a scripture reading, followed by a brief meditation period. Though hard to quantify the benefits of this 10- to 15-minute ritual, I can certainly “feel” how this positive energy carries me through the rest of the workday.

Like a well-maintained machine, our body, mind and soul will yield better work results if we feed them well. Invest the time to detect opportunities and act on them. As with all new habits, I suggest starting small and (very) gradually expanding on them.

I want to close this newsletter with a quote from Abraham Lincoln: “You cannot escape the responsibility of tomorrow by evading it today.” Exercise your accountability muscles by analyzing and detecting opportunities in your personal life. Acting on them should translate into improvements at work. As you embark on this journey, count on me to help you succeed.

In the next newsletter, I will share personal insights on how to better manage your priorities in life. Stay tuned!

Percy M. Cannon
Author, Business Consultant and Professional Coach
www.cannonbalance.com
www.thebusinessapostolate.com

PS: Use this link to ask questions, post comments, and request topics you would like to see in future issues.