Do You Want to Become a Better Corporate Manager?

Being a manager in a corporation is not easy. You likely face a litany of challenges and are expected to rise to the occasion with little help. You are expected to deliver your performance objectives with limited resources, work with colleagues you may not necessarily trust, or deal with lackluster direct reports. Do any of these problems sound familiar?

If challenges like these are not addressed promptly, you could miss your performance objectives and hurt your advancement opportunities. So, you have two choices: Do more of what you have been doing or elevate your game as a manager by learning how to deliver results through others.

In this and future articles, I will share tips to help you become a better corporate manager. I will build on the lessons learned during my 25 years as a manager for three large corporations (P&G, IBM, and Microsoft), as well as my seven years as an executive coach for over 200 professionals. 

Tip #1: Become a coach to your direct reports.Think about the best manager you’ve had in your life. What made them such a good manager? In my case, early in my corporate career I had a manager who regularly called me to his office to brainstorm potential solutions to business challenges. One of these challenges was to address the low brand awareness of a recently launched product. We held several

brainstorming sessions, covering such topics as defining the problem, reviewing the data available, searching for best practices, developing potential solutions, finding alternative ways to enlist other internal areas for feedback and support, developing a plan, seeking approval and funding, and executing the plan.

Throughout the entire process, my manager coached me, mostly one-on-one. At the end, he empowered me to lead the execution of the plan: making our product the exclusive sponsor of a game show in a highly rated TV time slot. This and other actions resulted in significant improvements in brand awareness, sales, and market share.      

My manager not only coached me on how to analyze and address business challenges, but he also taught me how to coach direct reports. I paid it forward when I became a corporate manager myself and aimed to follow his coaching best practices with my new direct reports.

Contact me if you need help developing the skills and capabilities to become a better coach, significantly increase your business results through your direct reports (and peers and even your boss) and, as a result, accelerate your career growth.

Percy M. Cannon
www.cannon.consulting

Showing Up On Time

Your punctuality (or lack of it) sends a message to the person(s) you are about to meet. This article by Shep Hyken should provide you with additional motivation to always be on time.

https://hyken.com/customer-service-strategies/showing-up-on-time-respect/

Stanford psychology expert: This is the No. 1 work skill of the future—but most fail to realize it

Can you guess which skill this is? Hint#1: It’s not a new one. Hint#2: It’s more challenging now than before.

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/09/stanford-psychology-expert-most-important-work-skill-of-the-future.html

Creating a Culture of Excellence The Go-Giver Way, Part 5

The Go-Giver Way™️

This is the last article of a five-part series where I provide suggestions that you can start adopting right away to promote excellence within and outside your organization. If you missed any of the previous ones, please click here.

I will continue to build on the content from “The Go-Giver book series written by Bob Burg and John David Mann, as well as my nearly four decades of international corporate experience, first as an executive and now as a coach.

Today, we will cover the fifth principle, The Law of Receptivity: The key to effective giving is to stay open to receiving.

Giving and receiving are two sides of the same coin. They work best in tandem. It’s like breathing out and breathing in, like exhaling and inhaling. They work together. Giving is possible because there is somebody else who will receive. If you don’t allow yourself to receive, you stop the flow. Giving earns you the right, not the entitlement, to receive.

Initially, I had some reservations about this law, perhaps tied to negative experiences with “Give-to-Get” practices. Time has proved me wrong.

As part of my executive coaching practice, at the beginning of each engagement, I regularly include an exercise called 360 feedback. It is a process where the coach gathers feedback on the executive from bosses, peers, and direct reports. In one case, the executive was a CEO of a joint venture. He reported to a board with representatives of the two shareholder groups. I had phone calls with most of the board members.

Something interesting—and out of left field—happened in one of these calls. It was with the senior member of one of the shareholders, whom I did not know before the call. After giving me his feedback on the CEO, he asked me questions about my coaching practice and experience. Several months later, and within a few days apart, this group referred me to two executives from different companies. Of course, I gladly accepted the referrals and thanked them for their generosity.

The Law of Receptivity and its complementary Law of Left Field (the greatest gifts will come to you at moments and from places you least expect) were probably the most difficult ones for me to grasp…until the referrals started arriving…out of left field.

When an organization truly exhibits a culture of excellence, we see greater collaboration and productivity, increased innovation, and improved satisfaction for both internal and external customers. Living with a giving spirit creates a rising tide that raises all ships, including the one belonging to the generator of this tide. Create a culture of excellence, and you will reap the rewards of excellence.

Contact me if you wish to adopt a culture of excellence The Go-Giver Way and enjoy extraordinary results.

Percy M. Cannon
www.cannon.consulting

Live Up to a Higher Standard of Service

Another good customer experience story from Shep Hyken, where he challenges the readers to hold themselves to a high standard, one that will likely exceed the customer expectations. Have you set a high standard for the experience you want to give to your customers, in writing?

https://hyken.com/customer-care/live-up-to-a-higher-standard-of-service/?inf_contact_key=7383f3cf37a2c673048020e01383449fd18a532c4142cb79caf2b269de1401fa

How I Measure My Life

The attached article offers an interesting approach for measuring success in your life. No, it’s not necessarily about your financial net worth…

Check out the three areas where the author suggests to place your focus and continuous improvement efforts: Energy, Work and Relationships.

Any reactions to this article?

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/how-i-measure-my-life

Creating a Culture of Excellence The Go-Giver Way, Part 4

The Go-Giver Way™️

This is the fourth article of a five-part series where I provide suggestions that you can start adopting right away to promote excellence within and outside your organization. If you missed any of the previous ones, please click here.

I will build on the content from “The Go-Giver book series written by Bob Burg and John David Mann, as well as my nearly four decades of international corporate experience, first as an executive and now as a coach.

Today, we will cover the fourth principle, The Law of Authenticity: The most valuable gift you have to offer is yourself.  

Authenticity is something you can’t fake, at least not for the long term. People can smell falsehood a mile away, so show up as yourself. All the skills in the world (sales, technical, people, etc.), as important as they are, are all useless if you don’t come at it from your true, authentic core.

What can you do to discover and live from your authentic core? In a previous article, I outlined the steps I took to redefine mine when I was approaching 50. However, you don’t need to wait until you turn 50 or any age to discover and define your authentic core or, as it was in my case, to redefine it.

The concepts of intrinsic and extrinsic value can help you in this process. We, as individuals, have two types of value:

  1. Intrinsic or internal value: We automatically have this by virtue of being born.
  2. Extrinsic or market value: This is your strengths, traits, talents, and characteristics that allow you to add value to others, your organization, the marketplace, and the world, in a way that you get compensated for it.

One thing I learned early in my corporate career was to deal differently with strengths and weaknesses:

  • Drive your strengths as hard and proactively as possible. This is what will shape your market value.
  • Manage your weaknesses. Unless they are severe, your value proposition will probably not be driven by devoting time and energy into attempting to turn them into strengths.

My advice to you: Focus on your assets of value. Become a professional student by:

  • Reading books and participating in training programs to grow your skills.
  • Learning from others: Search for role models and adapt what is applicable to you.
  • Using coaching and mentoring to accelerate your professional growth.

Remember: “A critical skill in your business is your capacity to be authentic—to make a connection.”

Contact me if you wish to discover or adjust your authentic core, as a step toward adopting a culture of excellence The Go-Giver Way and enjoying extraordinary results.

Percy M. Cannon
www.cannon.consulting

What Can You Do To Create a Better Experience For Your Customers?

This article by Shep Hyken suggests to create a list of “customer focused-musts” for your business. What would go on that list? Whatever you and your team think would create an overall better customer experience.

I think creating the list will probably be a straight-forward process. How about choosing the first item you want to implement from that list? If you have “customer centricity” or something similar in any of your strategic or corporate documents, don’t give up until such first item on the list gets implemented with excellence.

And once executed, go for the second item.

https://hyken.com/customer-service-strategies/what-can-you-do-create-better-experience-for-customers/?inf_contact_key=2abbb64689c391cad3927bfbf02e7044d18a532c4142cb79caf2b269de1401fa



20 Work-Life Balance Tips and Secrets From CEOs

Work-Life Balance is a personal decision. These 20 CEOs offer good tips from which you can pick and choose those which you think could apply to you.

If you want to go deeper into this subject, I want to suggest a 3-step process for your consideration, outlined in my book The Business Apostolate, Insights to Define and Achieve Your Mission in Life:

Step1: Become 100 percent accountable for the decisions you make (and not make) in your life.

Step 2: Develop and record in writing your personal mission statement.

Step 3: Live your mission 24/7.

Any thoughts you would like to share on this topic?           

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/20-life-balance-tips-secrets-153357460.html

Creating a Culture of Excellence The Go-Giver Way, Part 3

The Go-Giver Way™️

This is the third article of a five-part series where I provide suggestions that you can start adopting right away to promote excellence within and outside your organization. If you missed any of the previous articles, please click here.

I will build on the content from “The Go-Giver book series written by Bob Burg and John David Mann, as well as my nearly four decades of international corporate experience, first as an executive and now as a coach.

Today, we will cover the third principle, The Law of Influence: Your influence is determined by how abundantly you place other people’s interests first.  

If you want to attract people to you and your ideas, there are two broad ways to accomplish this:

  • Use positional leadership, which may drive compliance but is not very effective, or
  • By influence, which drives commitment by focusing on “what’s in it for the other person.”

Three features that enable genuine influencers to accomplish great things with and through people are:

  • They kick off meetings by “framing” the issue or topic to be covered and by clarifying the goals, then they step back to let the discussion flow.
  • They step into the other person’s shoes. They listen to the interests of the meeting participants to understand what’s in it for them.
  • They let go of having to be right and allow team members to share their suggestions without being concerned about contradicting the leader.

Bob Burg, co-author of “The Go-Giver,” follows what he calls “The Golden Rule of Business”: “All things being equal, people will do business with, and refer business to, those people they know, like and trust.” A variation of this rule also holds true for relationships within an organization: “People will assist, do things for, make things easier for, speed up the process for, and collaborate with those whom they know, like, and trust.”

How can you apply the three elements of this Golden Rule of Business to the corporate world?

  1. Know: It’s not just about who you know, but also who knows you and knows how effective you are in leading and influencing others.
  2. Like: By showing genuine interest in a person, you will find that the know, like, and trust relationship builds faster. Ask them questions, such as how they started their professional career, what they enjoy most from their job, and in what ways can you contribute to their work.
  3. Trust: This may take time, and it’s one area where referrals, covered in Part 2, can become very useful.
     

There is no better or more powerful way to influence others than by switching your focus from “What’s in it for me” to the “What’s in it for them.”

Contact me if you see an opportunity to adjust your personal or team’s influence style as a step toward adopting a culture of excellence The Go-Giver Way and enjoying extraordinary results.

Percy M. Cannon
www.cannon.consulting